Branding

Loyola was looking for a brand that would enable future students to envision themselves on campus. The college also wanted the brand to extend across different phases in the college selection process, and also be adaptable to different segments of their distinct audiences. Loral has experience as a creative and editorial director creating brands that need to relate to one another, and yet are distinct enough to be unique.

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Branding1

This piece was a lead generator, typically sent to freshmen or sophomores in high school.

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Branding2

A targeted piece for admitted students who had selected Loyola as their top choice during their senior year of high school.

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branding3

This brand has legs, because this piece shows how the campaign was woven into messages for an entirely different audience: transfer students. These college sophomores or juniors typically just want the facts of what to do next—they are looking for less emotion and more substance, since they typically have a clearer picture of what they are looking for.

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Moody Bible Institute needed a new brand to encompass new audiences—seminary and another location across the country. The issue was that there was only a week or two to produce a new look for all recruiting materials! The solution was using a “family” brand, where you can see the relationship between schools, but a definite distinction.

branding5

Different color were chosen for the higher level of graduate education: green and purple. Other colors were later added for publishing, corporate and radio divisions.

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branding6

Student Perspectives were used to draw savvy seminary students who wanted to read about what students had to say about the school. Photos were taken and several interviews were conducted.

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branding7

A background texture for the Spokane, Washington campus that wanted to express its mountainous, more “natural” identity than the Chicago corporate headquarters. The students there loved this design, and the brand was close enough that people who saw both brochures could tell that both was from the same college—but different campuses.